Electronic Devices

Durham Police Body Camera Pilot Project Ends

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP


Durham Regional Police Services (“DRPS”) have been involved in a one-year pilot project called the “Body-Worn Camera Project”.  Eighty front-line police officers have been wearing the devices while on duty for the past year.  The pilot project is now being evaluated and it will be determined by the end of the year whether the body-worn cameras (“BWC”) will continue to be used on a daily basis.

BODY-WORN CAMERA PROJECT

The Body-Worn Camera Project was launched on June 22, 2018 at a cost of $1.2 million.  The price tag included the need for training, IT support, video management, evaluation and storage costs. 

The cellphone-sized devices are attached to the officers while on-duty and record specific police interactions with the public, not an entire shift.  It is at the officer’s discretion when to activate the cameras and when to turn them off.

Sergeant Jason Bagg believes that BWCs can enhance training, investigations and prosecution outcomes.  He is hopeful that BWCs will result in more guilty pleas and higher conviction rates in domestic violence cases.  He states:

Body-worn cameras have been used around the world to collect evidence for prosecutions, they’ve been used to improve community trust, police transparency, policy legitimacy and procedural justice.

However, despite the benefits of BWCs, this method has been met with criticism.  There are critics that are concerned about privacy and the fear that the video may become public.  There is also a concern that the processing of the video to be used in court may create delays, which may lead to charges being dropped.

BWC STUDY

Lakehead University researchers have been studying the effects of body-worn cameras (“BWC”) by police officers and their interaction with the public.  From November 20, 2018 to December 8, 2018, researchers joined the Festive R.I.D.E. program (designed to reduce impaired driving by setting up checkpoints to randomly stop motorists) with Durham Regional Police Service. 

During this study, officers wore cameras for eight shifts and did not wear them for seven shifts.  All officers involved in the study began their interaction with the public with an introduction, followed by advising the motorists that they were wearing a BWC and would be recording the interaction during the R.I.D.E. stop.

Surveys were given to 3,636 motorists following their R.I.D.E. check, which included questions about the R.I.D.E. experience and their general opinions regarding the police.  A total of 287 surveys were analyzed and results showed that those who interacted with an officer wearing a BWC felt more positive about all outcomes measured in the survey.  The study found that those who interacted with officers wearing a BWC had more positive perceptions of:

  • Officer politeness during the R.I.D.E. interaction;
  • Officer fairness during the R.I.D.E. interaction;
  • Officer performance in general;
  • Confidence in police in general;
  • Police fairness;
  • Support for police use of BWCs.

The researchers concluded that the officers wearing BWCs and advising the public led to positive public perception of officers and the police in general, in addition to positive support for BWCs by the public.  Drivers, in general, found the officers wearing BWCs to be more polite and trustworthy.

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

DRPS officers turned off their BWCs on June 22, 2019, at the end of the pilot project.  Officers have recorded more than 26,000 videos, and it is estimated that 30% of the recordings have been or will be used as evidence in court for criminal and provincial offence trials.

The technology is now being evaluated as part of an ongoing cost-benefit analysis.  The cameras have been found to increase the workload for officers who use them, and there are extra costs associated with data processing and storage. 

Seven months into the project, DRPS found that there was no significant increase in officer overtime, reduced call responses or affected traffic enforcement.  DRPS did find that officers using BWCs were spending approximately 10% more time on scene (approximately 5 to 12 more minutes).  Sgt. Bagg also confirmed that there had been an increase in workload as a result of managing cases with camera evidence at the half-way mark of the project, however, it was unclear what the impact was. 

A final report on the pilot project is expected to be issued by the end of the year.

We will continue to report any developments or results of an evaluation of the BWC pilot project on this blog.

In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding charges that have been laid against you or regarding your legal rights, please contact the knowledgeable criminal lawyers at Affleck & Barrison LLP online or at 905-404-1947.  Our skilled criminal lawyers have significant experience defending a wide range of criminal charges and protecting our client’s rights.  For your convenience, we offer a 24-hour telephone service to protect your rights and to ensure that you have access to justice.

U.S. Border Agents Can Demand Access to Your Cell Phone

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP

As schools go on holiday for March Break, many of those living in Ontario will begin their vacation by crossing the border into the United States. But be aware.  U.S. border agents can demand access to your cell phone and request your password to unlock your cell phone without probable cause.

In 2017, U.S. border agents inspected more than 30,000 phones and other devices. This was found to be an increase of nearly 60% from 2016.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection released an updated directive governing border searches of electronic devices on January 5, 2018 stating:

…border searches of electronic devices have resulted in evidence helpful in combating terrorist activity, child pornography, violations of export controls, intellectual property rights violations, and visa fraud.

U.S. DIRECTIVE: BORDER SEARCH OF ELECTRONIC DEVICES

The recently issued directive in the U.S. entitled “Border Search of Electronic Devices” provides the government with wide legal authority to search travellers’ belongings without a warrant at the border, including personal electric devices.

Basic Search

During this “basic search”, the officer may review and analyze information on the device that would be ordinarily visible by scrolling through the phone manually, including contact lists, call logs, calendar entries, text messages, pictures, videos and audio files.

Advanced Search

Border agents are authorized to perform an “advanced search” by connecting a phone to a hard drive to copy its contents for analysis when the need arises. This type of search may arise in cases where a traveller is on a watch list, there is “reasonable suspicion” of law-breaking or national security concerns. This type of analysis requires the approval of a supervisor.

Password

According to the new directive, agents have been granted the authority to request a password to open your phone without probable cause. You are allowed to refuse this request, however, doing so could result in your device being detained for further examination, your travel may be delayed, you can be denied entry if you are not a U.S. citizen or it may become difficult for the traveller to enter the U.S. on future occasions.

The Cloud

Border agents are not authorized to download old files from the cloud. They are allowed to search the data that is apparent on the phone, but cannot access anything that may be stored remotely. Officers can ask that travellers put their devices in an offline mode (airplane mode) or disable their network connectivity.

Sensitive Information

Lawyers who are crossing the border may claim solicitor-client privilege over documents by identifying sensitive documents. The officer must then consult with customs’ legal counsel and the U.S. attorney’s office to determine which files should be isolated from the regular search.

Destruction of Records

Copies of information held by U.S. customs must be destroyed following a search and any electronic devices must be returned, unless a security threat has been discovered.

WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR ELECTRONIC DEVICES WHEN CROSSING INTO THE U.S.?

It is recommended that individuals crossing the border be patient and allow the U.S. border agents to do their job. Canadians should be prepared to turn their phones over to the U.S. border agents, if asked. Canadians may be denied entry to the U.S. if they do not comply with requests made by the border agents. If assistance is requested to access your personal device, it is recommended that you comply to avoid any challenging situations.

Canadians are advised to put their mobile phones on “airplane mode” to protect their privacy, as border agents cannot download remotely or from the cloud without giving a reason.

It is highly recommended that private material be deleted from your electronics or transferred to the cloud prior to crossing the border. You may want to consider having backups of sensitive or important information on your phone in the event that your phone is detained by the government.

If you have questions regarding your rights, please contact the experienced criminal lawyers at Affleck & Barrison LLP online or at 905-404-1947. We take all steps necessary to protect your best interests. We maintain a 24-hour emergency service line and offer free confidential consultation to all perspective clients.