parole

Convicted Drunk Driver Marco Muzzo Could Receive Parole Next Month

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP

Marco Muzzo (“Muzzo”), an Ontario man convicted of impaired driving in a 2015 accident that killed three children and their grandfather, is scheduled to appear for a parole hearing on November 7, 2018.

Muzzo is seeking day parole and is eligible to apply for full parole in May 2019 and statutory release on June 18, 2022.

The children’s parents, Jennifer Neville-Lake and Ed Lake, plan to attend the parole hearing at the Beaver Creek Institution in Gravenhurst.

WHAT HAPPENED?

On September 27, 2015, Muzzo had returned home on a private jet from his bachelor party in Miami and picked up his Jeep SUV from the airport parking lot. He was speeding when he drove through a stop sign and plowed into the driver’s side of a minivan transporting the Neville-Lake family.

Muzzo was driving at least 120 km/h on a 60 km/h road at the time of the accident. Muzzo’s blood-alcohol content ranged from 0.19 to 0.25 per cent at the time of the crash, which is more than twice the legal limit in Ontario. Police officers at the scene reported that Muzzo smelled of alcohol, his eyes were glassy, he used the car to keep his balance, he was unable to understand instructions from the officers, and he urinated on himself.

Muzzo pleaded guilty to four counts of impaired driving causing death and two counts of impaired driving causing bodily harm for the crash that killed nine-year-old Daniel Neville-Lake, his five-year-old brother Harrison, his two-year-old sister Milly, and the children’s 65-year-old Grandfather, Gary Neville.

Neriza Neville, the children’s grandmother, and Josefina Frias, the children’s great-grandmother, were also injured in the accident, but survived the crash.

Ontario Superior Court Justice Michelle Fuerst sentenced Muzzo to 10-years in prison and banned him from driving for 12 years after he gets out of prison. This was the harshest sentence in Canadian history for an impaired driver without a prior record.

Justice Fuerst intended for her sentence to send a message to deter others from committing the same crime. She considered the aggravating factors of Muzzo choosing to drive drunk and that his prior speeding convictions reflected an “irresponsible attitude toward the privilege of driving”.

WHAT IS PAROLE?

According to the Corrections and Conditional Release Act, all offenders must be considered for some form of conditional release during their sentence. However, although an offender may be eligible for release does not mean that the release will be granted. The Parole Board of Canada must assess an offender’s risk to determine if a conditional release is warranted.

Parole is a conditional release from jail for offenders to serve the remainder of their sentence outside of the confines of the institution. The goal of parole programs is to provide a gradual, controlled, and supervised path between jail and freedom.

Day parole permits offenders to participate in community-based activities in preparation for full parole or statutory release. Day parole requires the offender to return each night to a community-based residence, otherwise known as a halfway house.

The Parole Board does not automatically grant parole, each individual case must be reviewed to determine suitability for release. The Parole Board will consider the following factors in determining whether an offender should be granted parole:

  • The offender’s criminal record;
  • The seriousness and nature of the offence;
  • The offender’s behaviour while in prison;
  • The offender’s release plan; and
  • The remorse he/she has expressed for the crime, and in Muzzo’s case, his guilty plea.

Victims are also allowed to provide written victim information to the Parole Board detailing any continuing impact the crime has on their life and any concerns they have for their own safety or the safety of their family.

The Parole Board can impose conditions to the day parole release in order to lessen the risk of re-offending, such as ordering abstinence or counselling. Offenders must also obey the law and report regularly to a parole officer.

Jennifer Neville-Lake, the mother of the three children killed in this devastating accident, has posted a plea on Facebook asking supporters to write to the Parole Board of Canada to oppose Muzzo’s conditional release. She has also posted a petition on Facebook requesting that Muzzo remain in prison for the remainder of his ten year sentence. She is attempting to make an example of Muzzo in an effort to prevent future drinking and driving accidents.  Over 9,100 people have signed the petition to date, with a goal of 10,000 signatures.

We will continue to follow the Muzzo case and will report any developments on this blog.

In the meantime, if you or a loved one have been charged with an impaired driving offence or any other driving offence or have any questions regarding your legal rights, please contact the experienced and knowledgeable criminal lawyers at Affleck & Barrison LLP. We offer a 24-hour phone service to protect your rights and to ensure that you have access to justice at all times. Contact our office online or at 905-404-1947.

Senior Who Beat Fellow Long Term Care Home Resident to Death Gets Life in Prison

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP

We previously blogged about Peter Brooks, a 76-year old man who had been found guilty of second-degree murder after Joycelyn Dickson who was beaten to death at a long term care facility in Scarborough in 2013.  Brooks had used a cane to fatally injure the other resident. He was also charged with attempted murder following an attack on another elderly resident at the same facility.

Brooks has since been sentenced to life in prison, and will not be able to apply for parole for another 10 years, which is the minimum period of time following a second-degree murder conviction.

The Trial

Brooks’ defence lawyer had argued that Brooks was not criminally responsible for his actions. The defence relied on evidence by a forensic psychiatrist who testified that Brooks had been suffering from dementia and delusions at the time of the incident which had caused damage to his brain’s frontal lobe and left him unable to distinguish the consequences of his actions:

We all know that, regardless of what Peter’s belief was, there is nothing that can justify his actions. This is where Peter’s departure from society’s moral code becomes glaringly obvious. He is still unable to appreciate the moral wrongfulness of his actions.

The Crown had argued that despite Brooks’ mild dementia, he had deliberately and intentionally attacked the two residents for “sweet revenge” (which had been Brooks’ own words). Brooks’ belief that the women had been conspiring against him was based in reality as the women had complained to management on a number of occasions about violent or hostile interactions they had previously had with Brooks. It was the Crown’s position that there had been no evidence of “psychotic thinking that can be raised above suspiciousness”, that Brooks had threatened to kill the resident and then took steps to act on the threat, that he ultimately minimized his conduct and blamed the victims, and then lied to the jury about being unable to remember the murder and made up an account of being told to “beat” the women in a dream.

All second degree murder charges have an automatic sentence of life in prison. If you have been charged with murder or manslaughter, or have questions about other criminal charges and your rights, contact the Oshawa criminal lawyers at Affleck Barrison online or at 905-404-1947. We maintain a 24-hour call service to protect your rights and to ensure that you have access to justice at all times.