roadside testing

Harsher Drinking and Driving Laws In Effect Next Week

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP

In Canada, impaired driving is the leading criminal cause of death and injury. Police report that in 2016, there were more than 70,000 impaired driving incidents, including almost 3,000 drug-impaired driving incidents.

On December 18, 2018, Part 2 of Canada’s new impaired driving legislation will come into force. These reforms to the impaired driving provisions of the Criminal Code include mandatory alcohol screening, facilitating the proof of blood alcohol concentration, eliminating and limiting defenses that reward risk-taking behaviour, and clarifying Crown disclosure obligations.

MANDATORY ALCOHOL SCREENING

The new reforms will implement mandatory alcohol screening in Canada. According to Canada’s Department of Justice website, research shows that up to 50% of drivers with a blood alcohol concentration above the legal limit are not detected at roadside check stops. Furthermore, other jurisdictions have found a significant decrease in fatal road accidents where mandatory alcohol screening was enacted.

With these changes, police officers will have an approved screening device on hand to test a breath sample of any driver they lawfully stop, even without reasonable suspicion that the driver has alcohol in their body. Under the current law, police officers must have reasonable suspicion that a driver has alcohol in their body before doing any roadside testing. Drivers who refuse to provide a breath sample could be subject to a criminal offence.

The Honourable Bill Blair, Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction, stated:

Giving law enforcement the ability to demand a breath sample from anyone following a lawful stop will make it easier to detect impaired drivers and get these drivers off of our roads. Those who get behind the wheel after using alcohol, or a combination of alcohol and drugs, will face serious legal consequences. Do your part in keeping yourself and loved ones safe and don’t mix alcohol or drugs with driving.

PENALTIES FOR IMPAIRED DRIVERS

Starting December 18, 2018, although mandatory minimum terms of imprisonment have not changed, there will be new mandatory minimum penalties including fines, and some higher maximum fines.

The new legislation for first time offenders with high blood alcohol concentrations that have not caused bodily harm or death is as follows:

  • With blood alcohol concentration (“BAC”) of 80 to 119 mg of alcohol per 100 mL of blood, first time offenders are subject to a mandatory fine of $1,000;
  • With BAC of 120 to 159 mg of alcohol per 100 mL of blood, first time offenders are subject to a mandatory fine of $1,500;
  • With BAC of 160 mg or over of alcohol per 100 mL of blood, first time offenders are subject to a mandatory fine of $2,000; and
  • A first time offender who refuses to comply with a lawful demand for a breath sample is subject to a $2,000 minimum fine.

For alcohol-impaired driving that does not cause bodily harm or death, the new mandatory minimum penalties for a second offence include a mandatory minimum 30 days imprisonment, and for third and subsequent offences a mandatory minimum penalty of 120 days imprisonment.

Drivers will also face the maximum penalty of life imprisonment for those convicted of dangerous driving causing death, which is a stiffer penalty than the current laws of a maximum of 14 years in jail.

DURHAM REGIONAL POLICE RELEASE NAMES OF ACCUSED IMPAIRED DRIVERS

Beginning November 15, 2018, Durham Regional Police launched their Festive R.I.D.E. program. Police officers have been conducting R.I.D.E. checks in Ajax, Pickering, Whitby, Oshawa, and Clarington.

Since commencing this campaign, Durham Police have been releasing the names of those charged with impaired driving every Monday under “Hot Topics” on their website. Those drivers that have been charged are identified by their name, age, gender, city, and the specific charges laid against them.

Earlier this month, York Regional Police also reported that they have adopted a “name-and-shame” campaign to keep impaired drivers off of the roads. York Regional Police will now release the names of those charged with impaired driving every Monday for the foreseeable future.

Durham Regional Police reported that its fourth week of the Festive R.I.D.E. program has led to 20 drivers being charged with drinking and driving offences after stopping more than 4,100 vehicles. In total, Durham Police has charged 63 drivers with drinking and driving offences during the four weeks of the R.I.D.E. program (down from 72 drivers charged at the same time last year). They also report that 51 motorists registered a WARN on a roadside screening device and had their driver’s licence suspended for 3 days.

If you have been charged with a driving offence of any kind or have any questions regarding your legal rights, please contact the experienced and knowledgeable criminal lawyers at Affleck & Barrison LLP online or at 905-404-1947. We offer a 24-hour phone service to protect your rights and to ensure that you have access to justice at all times.