stunt driving

Changes in Crime Patterns During the Pandemic

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP

The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting shelter-in-place orders across Canada have changed the way we currently live.  According to police departments, this new reality has also changed crime rates across communities.

Since the State of Emergency has been declared, Durham Regional Police report that both emergency calls for service (down 11.3%) and urgent calls for service (down 5.5%) have decreased.  However, routine calls for service have increased by 13.5%.

Durham Regional Police report that they have received changes in the following type of calls for service during the time period between March 17 to April 22, 2020 when comparing it to the same time period in 2019:

  • Unwanted persons calls are up by 58%;
  • Suspicious persons calls are up by 38%;
  • Domestic and domestic-related calls are up by 14%;
  • Fight calls are down by 50%;
  • Theft calls are down by 21%; and
  • Motor vehicle collisions are down by 47%.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ON THE RISE

Under normal circumstances, a woman in Canada is killed by her intimate partner every six days according to the Canadian Women’s Foundation.  Given the current pandemic, across the globe reports of familial and intimate partner violence is increasing.  In response to this harsh reality, the Canadian government has recently invested $40 million in women’s shelters and sexual assault centres across the country.  The government has also reported that it is providing $10 million for emergency shelters for Indigenous women and children fleeing violence.

Although Durham Regional Police and York Regional Police (increase of 22%) report an increase in domestic violence calls, police departments in Brampton, Mississauga and Caledon are not seeing an increase of this nature.

Experts warn that despite the number of calls made to the police, violence within the home may still be occurring.  Specialists in the field of domestic violence are concerned that women who should leave abusive situations may be afraid to call for help.  Under normal circumstances, abused women can come up with reasons to make contact with shelters by saying they were going to work or dropping children off at school.  Given the pandemic, vulnerable women do not have this justification to leave the home as schools and workplaces are closed.

Abused women and children are stuck in their homes with their abusers.  They may also be at more of a risk due to the overwhelming stress of the current situation.  Individuals who lack coping skills might be more likely to lash out at others in their household.

Given the current situation, women who were saving money to leave an abusive situation may not be in a position to do so now as many have lost jobs and may be afraid they won’t receive child support payments given that courts are not prioritizing child support cases at this time. 

Yasmine Youssef, the National Manager for Nisa Homes, a transitional home for Muslim and immigrant women and children, reported:

We’re seeing reports coming out of China, Italy and other countries that the number of domestic violence cases have tripled since the pandemic started.  We know it’s definitely affection women that are [experiencing] abuse very heavily, because now the resources are very limited, and they’re stuck at home with their abuser 24/7.

Experts are afraid that the numbers from police departments are not reflective of the reality.  They believe that the majority of those affected by domestic violence do not call the police.  According to Marlene Ham, the executive direction of the Ontario Association of Interval and Transition Houses (OAITH):

Our fear is that there are a lot of women who are experiencing violence in their home and they may not be accessing any services or supports.  We really want women to know that those services and supports are available, and there are many entry points to getting the services they need.

For those that are experiencing abuse, in an emergency call 911 or contact the Assaulted Women’s Helpline at 1-866-863-0511 or dial #SAFE on your mobile phone.

TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS DURING THE PANDEMIC

Since the pandemic began, across Ontario there are reports of fewer traffic violations, less drunk driving and fewer cases of fraud, however, in addition to the increase in domestic violence, police are finding increases in commercial break-ins and stunt driving.

Given that the roadways are less congested, some are taking this as permission to engage in stunt driving and speeding more than 50 km/h over the limit.

Stunt driving is an offence found under the Highway Traffic Act and anyone found guilty of breaking this law can be subject to a fine between $2,000 to $10,000 and/or imprisonment for a term of not more than six months.  The driver’s licence may also be suspended if convicted.

Last weekend, OPP caught a 18-year-old driver and his 19-year-old passenger driving on the QEW near Burlington travelling at a speed of 308km/h.  The individual was charged with stunt driving under the Highway Traffic Act and was charged with dangerous driving under the Criminal Code.  His driver’s licence has been suspended for seven days and his vehicle has been impounded. 

If you have been charged with a driving related offence or a domestic violence offence, please contact the knowledgeable criminal defence lawyers at Affleck & Barrison LLP online or at 905-404-1947.  Our skilled criminal defence lawyers have significant experience defending a wide range of criminal charges and protecting our client’s rights.  We offer a free consultation and are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  Trust our experienced criminal lawyers to handle your defence with diligence, strategy and expertise.

Police Services Launch Project ERASE to Target Dangerous Drivers

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP

On May 10, 2019, Durham Regional Police, OPP and police services across Ontario launched their annual campaign “Project E.R.A.S.E.” to eliminate street racing from our roadways. 

The operation utilizes police in the air and on the ground to stop dangerous driving that endangers the safety of the participants, spectators and other innocent vehicles on the streets.

WHAT IS PROJECT ERASE?

ERASE stands for “Eliminate Racing Activity on Streets Everywhere”.  This campaign started in 1996 and includes 22 police services (some of which include York, Durham, Peel, Halton, South Simcoe, Barrie, Waterloo and Toronto), the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of Transportation.  These police forces work together and provide resources such as planes, helicopters, unmarked vehicles and specially trained officers aimed at cracking down on street racing, stunt and aggressive driving in Ontario.

High speeds on our roadways is extremely dangerous.  Driving in this manner makes it difficult to stop safely if there is an emergency, if a car pulls out in front of the driver, or if a child runs into the roadway. 

Excessive speed was directly related to 10,000 motor vehicle collisions on OPP-patrolled roads last year alone.  In 2018, OPP laid a total of 5770 street racing charges.   According to the OPP, there have been more than 750 stunt driving charges laid in the Greater Toronto Area this year.

York Regional Police Insp. Ed Villamere stated:

Our mission is to change aggressive driving behaviour through education, awareness and strict enforcement of both the Highway Traffic Act and the Criminal Code of Canada. … If you are hooked on street racing, rest assured you will be hooked up in handcuffs, your car will be hooked up and impounded, and your driver’s licence will be suspended.

WHAT IS STREET RACING AND STUNT DRIVING?

Street racing is illegal and is defined under the Ontario Highway Traffic Act (section 172(1)):

No person shall drive a motor vehicle on a highway in a race or contest, while performing a stunt or on a bet or wager.

A regulation entitled “Races, Contests and Stunts” found in the Highway Traffic Act provides a list of behaviours that can encompass “stunt driving”.  Such behaviours that violate the law may include:

  • Exceeding the speed limit by 50 km/h or more;
  • Causing a vehicle to spin or circle;
  • Causing one or more wheels of a vehicle to leave the ground;
  • Driving without due care or attention;
  • Preventing another vehicle from passing;
  • Two or more vehicles driving side-by-side where at least one of the vehicles occupies a lane intended for oncoming traffic;
  • High speeds decreasing a driver’s ability to react to pedestrians and other motorists;
  • Loss of control of a vehicle because of speed or unsafe maneuvers;
  • Rollover hazards.

Unlike a typical speeding ticket, if you are charged with street racing or stunt driving, you will be subject to a 7 day administrative driving suspension, a 7 day vehicle impound and impound fees. 

If you are convicted of these offences, pursuant to section 172(2) of the Highway Traffic Act, there are even more severe penalties, which may include:

  • A fine ranging from $2,000 to $10,000; and/or
  • Imprisonment for a term of not more than six months; and
  • A driving suspension, which can last up to 10 years in some cases.

The consequences of street racing and stunt driving become even more serious if charges of careless driving or careless driving causing bodily harm or death are involved. 

If a driver is convicted of careless driving, he/she will face a fine of up to $2,000, six demerit points, and/or a jail term of six months, and a licence suspension of up to two years.

If a driver is convicted of careless driving causing bodily harm or death, he/she will face a fine of no less than $2,000 to the maximum of $50,000, six demerit points, and/or imprisonment up to two years, and a licence suspension of up to five years.

STREET RACES AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Some drivers communicate and coordinate illegal activities, such as street racing, through social media. 

OPP Supt. Tony Cristilli advises:

They run so-called qualifying races in municipalities around the GTA and often hold final races on our 400 series highways patrolled by the OPP.  Take it to the race track where it belongs.

Police are encouraging the public to report any information regarding street racing activity or videos found on social media of street racing or dangerous driving behaviours in Ontario.

According to OPP Supt. Tony Cristilli:

There are different forms of communication these days and social media is definitely one platform that’s used to communicate these activities.  Obviously that reaches a broad spectrum of people that are out there that’s on social media who could easily advise the police.

If you are facing a street racing or stunt driving charge or any another driving offence, please call the experienced criminal lawyers at Affleck & Barrison LLP at 905-404-1947 or contact us online.  We offer a free consultation, and are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Oshawa Man’s Car Impounded After He is Caught Speeding at 166 km/h

Written on Behalf of Affleck & Barrison LLP

An Oshawa man’s car was impounded after he was caught driving 166km/h in a 100km/h zone on Highway 115, close to Peterborough County Road 28. His driver’s license was immediately suspended for seven days, and his car was towed from the scene. The driver has been charged with stunt driving.

Penalties for Speeding

Speeding, particularly if you are driving more than 50km over the speed limit, has significant consequences, up to and including jail time.

Speed Consequences
0-15 km over the limit ·         Fine for speeding

·         No demerit points

16-20km over the limit ·         Fine for speeding

·         3 demerit points

30-49km over the limit ·         Fine for speeding

·         4 demerit points

·         If G1 or G2 driver, 30 day license suspension

·         Insurance increase

50 km over the limit ·         Fine for speeding

·         6 demerit points

·         If G1 or G2 driver, 30 day license suspension

·         Insurance increase

50 km over the limit- stunt driving- racing ·         Fine for speeding

·         6 demerit points

·         Immediate vehicle impound (7 days)

·         Immediate license suspension (7 days)

·         One year license suspension

·         Dramatic insurance increase

·         Minimum fine $2000, maximum fine $10,000 on conviction

 

Stunt Driving

In addition to situations where a driver is going more than 50km over the limit, stunt driving can also be charged in situations including those where a driver is:

  • Racing/engaged in a competition;
  • Driving in a way that suggests he/she has an intention to chase another vehicle;
  • Driving without due care and attention, without “reasonable consideration for other persons using the highway”, or in a way that may endanger other persons;
  • Outdistancing or attempting to outdistance other vehicles while speeding;
  • Repeatedly changing lanes in close proximity to other vehicles while speeding;
  • Preventing another vehicle from passing.

Stunt driving also encompasses situations where actual tricks or stunts are performed by drivers including:

  • “Wheelies” (i.e- driving with only one wheel on the ground)
  • Donuts
  • Driving with a person in the trunk
  • Driving while the driver is not sitting in the driver’s seat

If you have been charged with a driving offence, call the Oshawa criminal lawyers at Affleck & Barrison LLP at 905-404-1947 or contact us online. We offer a free consultation and are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Trust our experienced lawyers to handle your defence with diligence, strategy, and expertise.